Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Translational Medicine Las Vegas, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Sevtap Savas

Memorial University of Newfoundland Canada

Keynote: Choosing the best genetic model to investigate the genetic polymorphisms in survival analyses

Time : 09:05-09:35

OMICS International Translational Medicine-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sevtap Savas photo
Biography:

Sevtap Savas obtained her PhD in Molecular Biology and Genetics in 1999 from the Bogazici University, Turkey. She trained as a Post-doctoral Fellow and Research Associate in Louisiana State University (USA), Mount Sinai Hospital Research Institute (Canada) and Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute (Canada). Since 2008, she has been an Assistant Professor at Discipline of Genetics, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). Her research program currently focuses on genetic prognostic studies in colorectal cancer using genetic, epidemiological, biostatistical and computational approaches and development of public databases. She also serves as a reviewer, academic editor or Editorial Board Member for several journals.

Abstract:

One of the current hypotheses in biomedical research is that genetic polymorphisms affect the risk of patient outcomes. However, in contrast to other variables, identification of the genetic effects of the polymorphisms on survival outcomes requires distinct considerations, including choosing an appropriate genetic model for each polymorphism during the statistical analyses. Among the applied genetic models are the recessive, dominant, co-dominant and additive models. Each of these models investigates the patient groups based on their genotypes differently. For example in the recessive genetic model, patients with the minor allele homozygous genotype are assumed to have different survival characteristics compared to patients with the major allele homozygous or heterozygous genotypes. In the absence of a biological evidence, the majority of the studies investigate the polymorphisms assuming one or a few select genetic models (which causes potential loss of information) or to apply all genetic models (which creates multiple testing issue). Previously to overcome these issues, we had suggested selecting the best suitable genetic model by examining the Kaplan Meier survival curves of a polymorphism stratified by each genotype (major allele homozygous, minor allele homozygous and heterozygous genotypes). In this presentation, the author will first discuss this approach and then its application to numerous SNPs examined in relation to survival outcomes in a cohort of colorectal cancer patients. Please note this approach can be applied to other genetic variations, such as somatic mutations and copy number variations.

Keynote Forum

Shulin Li

MD Anderson Cancer Center USA

Keynote: Mis-localized protein for circulating tumor cell capture and detection in sarcomas and beyond

Time : 09:35-10:05

OMICS International Translational Medicine-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shulin Li photo
Biography:

Shulin Li received his PhD at Washington State University and did his Postdoctoral studies at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is a Professor of immune therapy and metastasis diagnosis at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has published more than 60 peer reviewed papers and co-edited 3 books.

Abstract:

There are numerous approaches for detecting circulating tumor cells (CTC) but none of approach can provide confident call on the malignant identity of the captured cells. In this key note speech, this presenter will show the power of a new class of proteins, which are mis-localized in malignant cells as malignant tumor cell marker for CTC capture/detection. This type of protein such as cell surface vimentin could serve as a universal marker for CTC capture or validation of malignant identity of the captured cells using other methods.

  • Translational Modelling of Safety and Efficacy, Translational therapeutics and technologies, Clinical Epidemiology, Clinical and translational oncology
Location: Tropicana-2
Speaker
Biography:

Klara Valyi-Nagy, M.D., is Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago and Associate Director of the University of Illinois Biorepository. Her primary research interests include three-dimensional cultures in oncology research and tissue banking and extracellular matrix-genome interactions in cancer.

Abstract:

Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) patterns are present in a wide variety of malignant tumors, represent the formation of perfusion pathways by tumor cells, and their presence in tumors is associated with adverse outcome. Mechanisms by which VM may contribute to adverse outcome are not well understood. Previous observations in our laboratory indicate that VM-forming tumor cells have increased resistance against herpes simplex virus-mediated oncolysis in three-dimensional (3D) uveal melanoma, prostate, breast and embryonal carcinoma cultures. To determine whether VM-forming tumor cell subpopulations also have increased resistance against cytotoxic drugs, traditional two-dimensional (2D) and extracellular matrix (Matrigel)-containing 3D cultures of C918 uveal melanoma cells were established. In 2D cultures, C918 cells grew in monolayers. In 3D cultures, C918 cells formed a number of morphologically distinct tumor cell subpopulations that included cells that grew in monolayers on the Matrigel surface, cells that formed VM patterns, and cells that formed monolayers on the bottom of the culture dish. Following exposure to cisplatin or cadmium chloride, VM-forming tumor cells demonstrated prolonged survival relative to other tumor cell subpopulations in 3D cultures and cells grown in 2D. These findings suggest that increased drug resistance is a mechanism by which VM-forming tumor cells contribute to adverse outcome.

Speaker
Biography:

Shulin Li received his PhD at Washington State University and did his Postdoctoral studies at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is a Professor of immune therapy and metastasis diagnosis at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has published more than 60 peer reviewed papers and co-edited 3 books.

Abstract:

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released from primary tumor tissues into bloodstream or lymphatic vessels are emerging as novel tools in the detection and prognosis of several types of metastatic cancers. At present, CTC markers are limited to epithelial cancers and there are no specific markers available to detect mesenchymal and epithelial-mesenchymal transformed (EMT) CTCs. To address this gap in technology, we discovered the utility of cell-surface vimentin (CSV) as a marker for detecting CTCs from any given tumor type. CSV localization is limited to cancer cells and is not observed in normal cells found in the blood, thus making it an excellent target for detecting cancer cells in the blood. We have developed a monoclonal antibody 84-1 against CSV that is highly specific and sensitive towards CTCs and can detect as low as 1 CTC from 1 billion blood cells. Using this antibody and CSV as a target, we have detected and enumerated CTCs from patients with different cancer types including cancers of colon, lung, liver, breast, bone, neuroblastoma and a wide variety of sarcomas. Detection and molecular characterization of CTCs is one of the fastest growing areas of translational cancer research. Utilizing CSV as a target, we can enumerate and isolate rare CTCs that will aid in the early detection of tumors, metastasis, and relapse and will contribute to the development of specific targeted therapies, an ultimate goal of personalized medicine.

Break: Coffee Break 10:55-11:15@ Atrium

Michael K. Danquah

Chicago State University USA

Title: Hedgehog and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Treating Breast Cancer

Time : 11:15-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Michael Danquah, M.S., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chicago State University College of Pharmacy (CSU-COP). He obtained his Master’s Degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Dr. Danquah’s research interests include: (i) Design and synthesis of novel biodegradable polymers for drug and nucleic acid delivery. He has several peer-reviewed journal articles, serves an editorial board member of 5 journals and is the author of the book “Emerging Trends in Cell and Gene Therapy”.

Abstract:

Majority of breast cancer patients relapse and progress to metastatic disease despite initial response to chemotherapy. The reasons for chemoresistance include presence of cancer stem cell (CSC) sub-populations possessing tumorigenic potential and upregulated oncogenic pathways. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferative effects of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (afatinib and gefitinib) and two hedgehog inhibitors (vismodegib and cyclopamine) to identify potential synergistic combinations for treating breast cancer. The effect of afatinib, gefitinib, cyclopamine and vismodegib on the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro was first examined. Using a combination of MTT assay, isobologram analysis and response surface modeling, combination of afatinib or gefitinib with vismodegib or cyclopamine was observed to be synergistic in their ability to inhibit breast cancer cell growth. This effect was found to be dose, time, cell line and schedule dependent. Also, since the anticancer agents studied are extremely hydrophobic, polymeric micelles were fabricated using lactic acid and carbonate based copolymers to improve drug solubility. Polymeric micelle formulations were found to increase the aqueous solubility of these compounds several fold.

Speaker
Biography:

Gert Storm is a (bio)pharmaceutical Scientist at Utrecht University (Dept. Pharmaceutics). He studied biology and obtained his Ph.D. at the Dept. of Pharmaceutics of the same university. He is also Professor (Targeted Therapeutics) at the MIRA institute of the University of Twente (Netherlands). Besides, he keeps a position at the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) within the Centre for Image-Guided Oncological Interventions. He is (co-)author of more than 400 publications in the field of advanced drug delivery/drug targeting and imaging-guided drug delivery.

Abstract:

Targeted nanomedicines are being developed to increase the therapeutic index of anticancer drugs. Temperature-responsive drug delivery vehicles that release their payload upon applying a local temperature increase using focused ultrasound offer the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy. The combination of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery with MRI allows full spatial and temporal control of the drug delivery process. This new field of MR image-guided drug delivery creates exciting opportunities to expand applications of existing drugs by altered (and often tunable) pharmacokinetics and to monitor and validate drug delivery. The HIFU-CHEM project is a translational project sponsored by the Dutch public-private organization CTMM and is investigating new treatment options of liver and bone metastasis using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) guided by MR (MRgHIFU) in combination with temperature-sensitive nanomedicines. MRI provides anatomical information for planning of the therapeutic intervention, temperature mapping for local hyperthermia control, as well as monitoring of the local drug release. Besides inducing a local temperature raise, the interaction of ultrasound waves with tissue may also enhance extravasation and membrane permeability due to local pressure fluctuations, leading to a further increase of drug uptake. The project will bring for the first time ever the concept of local drug delivery using MRgHIFU in combination with ThermoDox®, a temperature-sensitive liposome encapsulating doxorubicin as the chemotherapeutic drug, into the clinic. The HIFU-CHEM consortium brings together academic and industrial technological teams on MRgHIFU (UMCU, Philips), drug nanotechnologies (UMCU, Technical University Eindhoven, Celsion) as well clinical teams specialized in applications of MRgHIFU (NIH, UMCU).

Jan Olof G Karlsson

Linkoping University Sweden

Title: Mangafodipir (MnDPDP) from bench to bedside

Time : 12:05-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Jan Olof G. Karlsson has a PhD from Linköping University. Between 1990 and 1992 he held a position as a research fellow at the Swedish Medical Research Council. Thereafter he worked as a senior scientist for Nycomed Imaging, which later became GE Healthcare, until 2007. At present he is a scientific advisor at PledPharma AB. Karlsson has published 75 scientific papers and is inventor of 9 issued patent families. During the early 1990’s Karlsson was involved in research showing that the MRI contrast agent mangafodipir possesses SOD-mimetic activity, a potentially useful property in treatment of several pathological conditions.

Abstract:

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) participate in tissue damage, caused by e.g., ischemia-reperfusion, inflammation, drugs and radiation. The mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plays a key role in keeping ROS and RNS in check. During development of MnDPDP as an MRI contrast agent it was serendipitously discovered that MnDPDP and its metabolite MnPLED possessed MnSOD mimetic activity. Subsequently it was shown that it protected mice against serious side effects of several chemotherapy drugs, without interfering negatively with the anticancer effect. The compound was first tried in a colon cancer patient going through palliative treatment with 5-FU plus oxaliplatin. A first clinical feasibility study in colon cancer patients going through adjuvant 5-FU plus oxaliplatin reported promising results in 2012. This was followed by another clinical feasibility study showing encouraging results when it comes to treatment of neuropathy caused by oxaliplatin. MnPLED has furthermore been shown to reduce myocardial infarction size in a pig model, and MnDPDP was recently tested as an adjunct to PCI in patients with ST-elevated myocardial infarctions, with promising results. MnDPDP has also been shown protect mice against acetaminophen-induced liver failure. Whereas MRI contrast depends on release of Mn2+, the MnSOD mimetic activity depends on Mn2+ still bound to DPDP or PLED. Calmangafodipir [Ca4Mn(DPDP)5] is stabilized with respect to Mn2+ and has at equimolar Mn2+ doses superior therapeutic activity in comparison to MnDPDP. Ca4Mn(DPDP)5 is at present explored as a chemotherapy adjunct in a clinical multicenter phase II study in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Milan Vaghasiya

Westmead Hospital Australia

Title: The Emergency Department Prediction of Disposition (EPOD) study

Time : 12:30-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Milan Vaghasiya has completed his Masters in Public Health and Master in Health Management from University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia. He is actively involved in research activities in Emergency Medicine Research Unit (EMRU) at the Emergency Department, Westmead Hospital in Sydney, Australia. Westmead Hospital is a tertiary 850-bed adult hospital with a level 1 trauma service and 41 treatment spaces in ED, which treats over 60,000 adult patients annually. His research interests are emergency medical services, models of care, organization efficiency and ED planning.

Abstract:

Background: Emergency departments (ED) continue to evolve models of care and streaming as interventions to tackle the effects of access block and ED overcrowding. Tertiary ED may be able to design patient flow based on the predicted dispositions in the department. Segregating discharge-stream patients may help develop patient-flows within the department, which is less affected by hospital bed availability. We aim to determine if triage nurses and ED doctors can predict disposition outcomes early in the patient journey and thus lead to successful streaming of patients in the ED. Methods: During this study, triage nurses and ED doctors anonymously predicted disposition outcomes for patients presenting to triage after their brief assessments. Patient disposition at the 24-h post ED presentation was considered as the actual outcome and compared with predicted outcomes. Results: Triage nurses were able to predict actual discharges of 445 patients out of 490 patients with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 90.8% (95% CI 87.8-93.2%). ED registrars were able to predict actual discharges of 85 patients out of 93 patients with PPV of 91.4% (95%CI 83.3-95.9%). ED consultants were able to predict actual discharges of 111 patients out of 118 patients with PPV 94.1% (95% CI 87.7-97.4%). PPVs for admission among ED consultants, ED registrars and Triage nurses were 59.7%, 54.4% and 48.5% respectively. Conclusion: Triage nurses, ED consultants and ED registrars are able to predict a patient\'s discharge disposition at triage with high levels of confidence. Triage nurses, ED consultants, and ED registrars can predict patients who are likely to be admitted with equal ability. This data may be used to develop specific admission and discharge streams based on early decision-making in EDs by triage nurses, ED registrars or ED consultants.

Break: Lunch Break 12:55-13:40@ Atrium

Rajiv Mahendru

Government Medical College for Women Haryana India

Title: Another possible etiology in unexplained infertility?

Time : 13:40-14:05

Speaker
Biography:

Rajiv Mahendru possessed Post-Graduate Degree in Obstetrics and Gynaecology from Himachal Pradesh University at the age of 29 years and became one of the youngest Professor. Presently, Head of the Department in the only second women medical college of India. He has 32 Publications in reputed journal and is the recipient of a prestigious Award for excellence in Medical field. Appointed as the Chief-editor of the Special issue of an international journal of repute and has numerous presentations to his credit at international arena as an invited Guest Speaker . He is the member of Academic Board of many universities, member of recruitment for medical teachers, and assessor for establishing Medical colleges.

Abstract:

Objective: The aim of study was to find out an association between anti-TPO-Ab, TSH and infertility among female patients attending the Gynaenecologycal OPD for the management of infertility. Many studies show a significant association between the presence of thyroid autoantibodies, infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss and this research study was conducted to corroborate this. Materials and Methods: A cross-Sectional study was conducted for the period of six months from Jan. 2011 to June 2011 in the Department of Biochemistry in collaboration with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Fifty infertile females of reproductive age group with either primary or secondary infertility were selected for the study and 50 age-matched non pregnant healthy females who had no problem of infertility were taken as controls. Serum anti-TPO Ab, TSH levels were evaluated by Enzyme linked Immunosorbant assay method. Result: The results obtained from the study showed statistical significance between anti-TPO Ab and TSH levels, age and infertility in both the groups. Conclusion: The parameters observed may be considered as a valuable aid in investigation and diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with unexplained infertility.

Speaker
Biography:

Tibor Valyi-Nagy, MD, PhD, is Professor of Pathology and Director of Neuropathology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received clinical and research training at the Medical University of Debrecen, Hungary, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, The Wistar Institute of Philadelphia and Vanderbilt University.

Abstract:

Altered expression of histone deacetylases (HDAC) may play a key role in the pathogenesis of a variety of neurological diseases. To determine whether neoplastic, infectious, and degenerative processes modify HDAC3 expression in the human brain, HDAC3 expression was defined by immunohistochemistry in sections of surgically removed tissue specimens and autopsy tissues from patients with glioblastoma, herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, Alzheimer’s disease and controls. In brain tissue controls without evidence of neurological disease, neurons and ependymal cells demonstrated nuclear HDAC3 staining, weak to moderate nuclear HDAC3 staining was detected in a minority of astrocytes and oligodendroglial cells, and no HDAC3 expression was detected in vascular endothelial cells. In HSV encephalitis, significant nuclear HDAC3 expression was detected in reactive astrocytes, mononuclear inflammatory cells and some vascular endothelial cells. In Alzheimer’s disease, there was focal decrease or loss of HDAC3 expression in neurons. In glioblastoma, neoplastic glial cells and endothelial cells of proliferated blood vessels demonstrated increased nuclear HDAC3 expression. These observations indicate that HDAC3 expression is modified in the human brain affected by infectious, degenerative and neoplastic processes and may lead to a better understanding of the role of HDAC3 in the pathogenesis of some of the clinically most significant neurological diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Gayatri Gogoi has done her MD in Pathology from Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, Assam under Srimanta Sankardev University and Health Sciences. She has deep interest in oncopathology, specially breast, haematolymphoid and endocrinal tumours. She has good experience of working on breast pathology and trained in oncopathology research by immunohistochemistry, Flowcytometry, etc. She has published many scientific papers on international and national journals like The Breast, Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism, International Journal of Basic and Applied Medical Science and so on. She had presented more than 10 research papers in various national and international conferences. She has also received couple of national level awards for best scientific paper presentations. Presently she is handling projects under Indian Council of Medical Research.

Abstract:

Background and objective: Breast cancer diagnosis at a young age is considered as a negative prognostic factor is a controversial issue. Many studies indicate that breast cancer in young women have unique clinicopathological characteristics than in the elderly, while few others have found no correlation between prognosis and age. A disturbing trend in India is that almost 48% affected women are of below 50 years age. Again cancer registry data from two large centres of North eastern states of India namely, Assam, showed incidence of 68.8% and 64.9% respectively belonged to younger than 50 years which indicates breast cancer is more commoner among young Assamese women within India. The objectives of this study to analyze clinico pathological characteristics of breast cancer in Assamese women under 44 years old [young age] and compare these prognostic characteristics to an older [45-70 years] women group. Methods: Total duration of study is 5 years. Study was done by both acquiring retrospective data from review charts for a period of year 2009, 2010 and prospectively recruiting diagnosed breast cancer cases from Department of Pathology from January 2011 to December 2013 of a large tertiary care Institute. The study included 543 women diagnosed with breast cancer out of whom 209 were under the age of 44 [designate as young age] and 334 were 45 years or over [designate as older age]. The clinicopathological characteristics of established prognostic implications are compared between two groups. Statistical Analysis was done by SPSS software17.0. For comparison of continuous variables t-test was used and the Chi-square test was employed for analysis of categorical variables. A result was considered significant if the p- value was <0.05. Institutional Ethical Committee clearance for study in Human subject was received. Results: The proportion of women diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 44 in our study was 38%. In comparison to their older counterparts, those under 44 had a higher tumour grade [64.1% with P value <0.001] in contrast to 43.7% in other. The young group had higher numbers of Infiltrating duct carcinoma [IDC-NOS] which is 78.5% as the predominant histological type and only 22% young women attended to diagnostic centre without axillary lymph node metastasis in compared to 39.8% in older age group. Unfortunately a large number of young women breast cancer got detected along with distant metastasis [47%]. Estrogen [ER] and or Progesterone receptor [PR] expression is found only 29.3% in young women, whereas 71.4% expression in older age which is statistically significant (p<0.001). The incidence of Triple negative breast cancer [TNBC] in young is accounted to about 53.4% and it is significantly higher. There was no statistical difference as regard to Her2 expression in both categories, which means a consistent universal pattern shown by both groups. Conclusion: Breast cancer in younger women is more likely linked to poor prognostic factors like higher grade, higher metastasis, Lack of ER, and or PR expression, leading to maximum cases of TNBC type and less likelihood of response by standard therapy. The young women who are of premenopausal age group are likely to have different biologic behavior so emphasis should be more on underlying genetic basis. The TNBC type of BC needs to be understood more and need to stress on effective therapeutic options. The present trend of BC is becoming cancer of young Assamese women.

Jing Zhang

Sichuan University China

Title: Prognostic role of Caveolin in breast cancer

Time : 14:55-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Jing Zhang is an MD candidate in West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University. He got National Encouragement Scholarship and scholarships in university every year. He has published 10 papers, SCI index.

Abstract:

Introduction: Recent studies have shown that caveolin play a potential role as a prognostic biomarker of cancers. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether caveolin could be a prognostic factor for patients with breast cancer. Materials and methods: All eligible studies were identified using Medline and EMBASE system. The patients\' clinical characteristics and survival outcome were extracted. The meta-analysis was performed to clarify the prognostic role of caveolin and the correlation between the caveolin expression and clinical characteristics. Results: After full text review, 19 articles were identified as eligible articles. We found that negative stromal Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression could predict the poor prognosis of breast cancer. The combined HR (95% CI) for OS was 4.12[2.05, 8.28], while the combined HR (95% CI) for DFS/PFS was 3.69 [2.57, 5.31]. The combined HR (95% CI) of tumor epithelial Cav-1 for OS was 0.78 [0.54, 1.12], and the combined HR (95% CI) for DFS/PFS was 1.32 [0.76, 2.29]. The combined HR (95% CI) of tumor epithelial Cav-2 for CSS was 2.04 [0.91, 4.56]. Odds ratios (ORs) showed that the stromal Cav-1 expression was associated with the AJCC stage, T status, lymph metastasis, distant metastasis, and histological grade (G grade) and many biomarkers. We found ORs of Cav-1 and Cav-2 expression in tumor epithelial cells varied in clinical characteristics and biomarkers. Conclusion: Our results indicated that negative expression of stromal Cav-1 was associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer, while the detection of Cav-1 and Cav-2 in tumor epithelial cells was not.

Speaker
Biography:

Jingwen Huang is still a junior medical student in West China Medical School, West China Hospital, and she has been focusing on biomarker study with her team since she came into university. She has published 7 papers in this area at this young age.

Abstract:

Background: Excision repair crosscomplementing-1 (ERCC1) has been reported to play a prognostic role and may indicate the treatment response in patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC). Nevertheless, the strength of evidence of ERCC1 predicting these two clinical outcomes are still controversial. Methods: Potentially eligible studies were retrieved using PubMed. Basic clinical characteristics of patients and statistical data with survival data were collected. Then a meta-analysis model was established to investigate the correlation between overexpression of ERCC1 and survival outcome as well as to determin whether the treatment response is dependent on expression stature of ERCC1. Results: 17 eligible studies and 1263 patients were yielded in our meta-analysis. The pooled HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for OS and DFS were 2.14 [1.51, 3.05] and 2.60 [1.98, 3.42], respectively. In terms of subgroup analysis, race was found to be a significant factor divided for these analyses, and the pooled HRs for the Asian subgroup are 2.97 [2.05, 4.32] and 2.75 [1.82, 4.13] respectively. In non-Asian subgroup, pooled HRs indicate the predict role for PFS 2.42 [1.60, 3.66], but no value for OS (P>0.05). With regard to treatment response, the pooled ORs were 3.04 [1.99, 4.62]. Rusult fom subgroup analysis that divided by race further showed that pooled ORs in Asian group were 3.95 [2.30, 6.78] and 1.93 [0.97, 3.84] in non-Asian group. Conclusion: ERCC1 could be a fine prognostic factor of HNSCC and can also prompt treatment response, which could be proven by further multicenter clinical trials.

Break: Coffee Break 15:45-16:05@ Atrium

Pascal HG Duijf

The University of Queensland Australia

Title: Ingredients for writing a Successful Grant

Time : 16:05-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

Duijf obtained a PhD degree in Human Genetics from the Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. His postdoctoral studies at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, NY, USA focused on how chromosome instability, the missegregation of chromosomes during cell division, contributes to cancer development and progression. In 2013, Dr Duijf established his independent research group at the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute and the Translational Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia. With an interest in breast and other cancers, his group studies chromosome instability in mouse models in order to develop new strategies to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Abstract:

Work shop on Ingredients for writing a Successful Grant